Thursday, 5 June 2014

EPP with Love Patchwork & Quilting Magazine


I may be wildly adding on a few zeros in saying this, but it feels as though I have at least 10,000 things all queueing up waiting to be written about from the past few months and having a temperamental Internet connection really isn't helping me work my way through them. It's not beginning at the beginning, but let's begin with this cushion that makes an appearance in this month's Love Patchwork & quilting magazine (issue 9), along with a four page article on English paper piecing techniques, just because it's available now and tends to sell out fairly quickly and it's the thing that I'm most excited to tell you about because it's my favourite sewing magazine.



I also have a hand-pieced quilt in there too, but I'll come to that in another post. Although it's not written specifically for beginners, the techniques article covers all the supplies and techniques you'd need if you're new to English paper piecing. If you're interested in trying it, this issue also comes with a free pack of pre-cut hexagons in three different sizes, so it's well worth investing in. And, as usual, it's also packed full of crazily good patterns and editorial from some of my favourite quilters.


When I quilted this cushion in March, it was the first time I'd turned on my sewing machine for weeks, possibly months, and I spent a thoroughly happy hour mowing up and down it with my walking foot. I mostly favour hand-sewing, but sometimes it's just so delicious to do something quickly.

I designed the cushion to give a project-based introduction to fussy-cutting for English paper piecing. 'Fussy Cutting' is basically cutting the fabrics in such a way that a certain part of the fabric's print is featured - in this case, if you cut the same part of the print repeatedly, it's possible to create a kaleidoscope effect when you sew them together.


The article breaks down how to go about creating a similar kaleidoscope cushion in your own choice of fabrics.


Generally, I plan out my projects on an as-I-go basis, but I was worried about running out of time when I was designing this, so I planned it on the computer before making it. For me, a project can often grind to a halt for days while it sits in limbo in a what-fabric-should-come-next dilemma. If there was one character trait I'd most like to rid myself of it would be indecision. For some reason, this doesn't happen when I plan things on the computer as it's so quick to swap things in and out and come to an instant decision about what looks right overall. Without any as-I-go indecision, when I got to the actual sewing part, the piecing was really quick and a print-out offers the added benefit of having a 'map' to work from. Additionally, it's freakily good fun seeing an exact replica of your print-out gradually appearing as you sew (or maybe it's just me that would find that fun). Below is my pre-planned print-out 'map' on the right, and the real hand-sewn fabric version of the cushion cover on the left - I love how similar they look. I should really be pre-planning my Passacaglia cogwheels in this way as I've wasted a huge amount of time pondering fabric choices over the last eight weeks, but I haven't, because often I just want to dive into the fabrics after a day of working on the computer, rather than doing more computering.


If you're tempted by some EPP, but a cushion looks like too big a first project, I also have a free downloadable tutorial for some really simple hanging lavender sachets over on the Love Patchwork & Quilting Magazine blog. I've fussy cut the fabrics for these too (um, because I'm a fussy-cutting addict), but that's not actually necessary - I think they'd look gorgeous made up with some Liberty Tana lawn prints.


In other thoughts, isn't fussy-cutting an absolutely awful term? I can't believe I've just written a blog post where it appears quite so many times and where I even confess my addiction to it. Maybe 'precision cutting' would be better...

Florence x

18 comments:

  1. congratulations on the feature! I love your fabric choices for the cushion, very pretty indeed x

    ReplyDelete
  2. Very nice, congratulations. I love your fabric-colors.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Beautiful projects! Precision cutting has a nice ring to it :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. What a beautiful cushion! Great colours too! xx

    ReplyDelete
  5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Ooh, these are lovely and I got the last copy of this mag in my local Tesco. I will peruse it at my leisure over the weekend! Xx

    ReplyDelete
  7. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Congratulations on your magazine piece! Personally I've lays liked the term fussy-cutting. When I first heard it I imagined a committee of quilters agonising over the exact placement ... And that's kind of what it is! A committee of quilters in your brain!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You've totally transformed the term for me, Michelle - thank you! I love that idea.

      Your whole account has disappeared from Instagram - was it an accident or did you decide not to use it anymore? I miss seeing your photos. x

      Delete
  9. My daughter organised a year's subscription for this magazine as a birthday present for me. (Lovely daughter that she is). And your fussy cut hexagon cushion is the project that inspired me most in this magazine.
    I rather like the term fussy cutting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a lovely daughter! I'm so pleased you liked my cushion - thank you!

      Delete
  10. This is the only sewing mag I subscribe to, it features some lovely designs. The cushion is fabulous and I like the term fussy cutting, seems less cold and calculating, though of course precision is the key to its successful outcome. May I ask, which software did you use to plan your design? I can take procrastination to a whole new level, pre-planning on my computer would really help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm so pleased so many people actually like the term - your attitude to it is transforming it for me!

      I use Adobe Illustrator for planning - it's not intended to be quilt software and has quite a learning curve, but if you are already familiar with it, it's fantastic!

      Delete
  11. My dictionary tells me that another word for fussy is precious so I say "Hurrah" for fussy-cutting!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Congrats on your great feature in my favourite magazine. I love EPP and was thrilled to find a cushion design with it too. x

    ReplyDelete
  13. Gorgeous cushion! I adore your EPP projects. They are stunning. I'm curious though -- what computer program do you use to plan out your projects?

    ReplyDelete
  14. Wow! That is beautiful. I love this magazine. I subscribe and look forward to seeing your cushion project.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Wow, your work is stunning and I love your expression of mowing up and down with your walking foot. With that it just occurred to me, I bet that's why I love straight line sewing, it is a lot like mowing.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you so much for taking the time to leave a message - it's always really lovely to hear from people.

I now tend to reply within the comments section, so please do check back if you've asked a question or wish to chat.

Florence x